ARTHRITIS is a progressive degenerative joint disease, characterized by CHRONIC INFLAMMATION, IMMUNE DYSFUNCTION, and JOINT DESTRUCTION.  The symptoms are: stiff, swollen and painful joints, reduced mobility, impaired emotional well-being, and impaired performance.  Joint diseases have a major impact on life quality and expectancy of your companion animal.

FACTORS THAT INCREASE THE RISK OF JOINT DISEASE

  • poor nutrition
  • aging, genetics
  • hormone imbalance
  • developmental dysplasia like hip dysplasia
  • joint overactivity
  • injuries
  • infections
  • toxic chemicals
  • heavy metals
  • excess body weight
  • immune dysfunction

UNTAMED HIP & JOINT – Equine, uniquely provides three powerful nutraceuticals Boswellia, Curcumin 95% extract (a most powerful turmeric extract), and Glucosamine Sulphate, which are proven highly effective by scientific research for the treatment of joint disease.  These nutraceuticals, combined with Spirulina and Kelp, target multiple physiological systems to provide superior, safe, and natural joint protection, alleviate pain and tissue degeneration, and enhance the quality of an active life.  In contrast to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, these extracts not only have an excellent safety profile with minimal side effects, they also nourish the body, and promote better health.

REVOLUTIONARY JOINT SUPPORT, PLUS SO MUCH MORE…

Inflammation is a natural process by which the body promotes healing, and protects itself against damage caused by injury, infection, free radicals and foreign substances. There are however many risk factors, as those mentioned above, that induce chronic inflammation and promote infiltration of inflammatory agents into the joints. If not controlled, these agents cause constant swelling, pain, and eventually degeneration of joint tissue.  Consequently, arthritis sets in, with a debilitating effect on mobility and well-being.

CURCUMIN 95% extract (Curcuma longa) is a highly concentrated extract from turmeric, and one of the most researched, and effective anti-inflammatory plant extracts.  Curcumin reduces inflammation by multiple mechanisms like inhibiting pro-inflammatory signaling, inhibiting immune cell migration to the active site of inflammation, and reducing excessive existing inflammation by decreasing the activity of inflammatory enzymes1-7. Curcumin illustrates pronounced potential to reduce joint pain, enhance articular function, and improve quality of movement10-12.

BOSWELLIA (Boswellia serrata) is a powerful anti-inflammatory plant extract.  It demonstrates pronounced clinical efficiency in the treatment of painful inflammatory conditions like muscle injuries, arthritic diseases.    Boswellia’s mechanisms of action in arthritic treatment include: inhibition of inflammatory agents, improvement of blood circulation to the joints, alleviation of pain, and decreased joint swelling.  In contrast to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) which disrupt glycosaminoglycan synthesis, Boswellia inhibits inflammation-induced degeneration of glycosaminoglycans levels, supporting the structural strength of the joints. 30,31 Research validates that Boswellia can significantly improve joint flexibility and mobility32.

SPIRULINA provides exceptional antioxidant activity against oxidative damage caused by physiological processes, heavy metals and toxic chemicals.  Oxidative stress causes cellular dysfunction and tissue degeneration, increasing the risk of various chronic diseases, including arthritis.  Spirulina activates antioxidant enzymes, inhibits fat oxidation and oxidative DNA damage, and scavenges inflammatory free radicals23. Its antioxidant properties in combination with its anti-inflammatory actions, may protect mobility by reducing exercise-induced oxidative muscle damage24, and alleviating arthritic symptoms like swelling, inflammation, cartilage degeneration, and liver stress29,55.

During aging or reduced activity, muscle mass and strength declines, and body weight may unhealthily increase.  This predisposes the animal to decreased joint stability and misalignment.  Consequently, with increased mechanical stress, degenerative inflammation sets in, deteriorating cartilage and joins.

SPIRULINAUNTAMED HIP & JOINT – Equine is fortified with Spirulina, a complete and nutrient-rich protein source.  It is rich in amino acids, which inhibit muscle degeneration, and stimulate muscle protein synthesis, helping to maintain your horse’s lean muscle mass and strength. Enhancing the strength of the muscles surrounding the joints may improve structural joint support, and decrease the risk of joint injuries51,52.  Protein also provides amino acids for proteoglycan and collagen production, which are essential building blocks in the extracellular matrix53. The extracellular matrix is present in all tissues, like the joints, muscles, tendons, cartilage, skin, and organs.  It provides structural support to the tissues and maintains proper hydration.  It is also responsible for vital biochemical and biomechanical processes involved in healthy tissue development.

CURCUMIN is well researched for its powerful anti-inflammatory actions.  And with its protective properties on cartilage8, it has exceptional medical value in the treatment of arthritic diseases. Research shows that highly concentrated curcumin extract stimulates the production of glycosaminoglycans, chondrocytes, and type II collagen which are involved in the formation and structural integrity of cartilage9.  It also inhibits inflammation-induced degeneration of cartilage and chondrocytes13,14.  Curcumin further inhibits joint inflammation and joint destruction by inhibiting bone resorption osteoclast cells, and blocking expression of genes, inflammatory enzymes like COX-2, and other inflammatory mediators that promotes joint degeneration25.

GLUCOSAMINE POTASSIUM SULPHATE is a superior form of glucosamine due to its enhanced bio-availability. It consists of a structural amino acid, glucosamine, which is abundantly found in joint cartilage, synovial fluid in the joints, and in the intervertebral discs.   It also contains Sulphur which is required by every cell in the body for efficient function.  Sulphur is a vital element for healthy connective tissues, it is utilized in detoxification of toxins, is involved in cellular respiration, promotes healing, and helps to relieve symptoms of arthritis. Research illustrates that Glucosamine Sulphate’s efficacy is superior to Chondroitin Sulphate in arthritic conditions. It has a growth-promoting effect on cartilage, and delays cartilage degeneration by various effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Studies conclude that long term supplementation with Glucosamine Sulphate clinically benefits arthritis sufferers by reducing pain, reducing arthritis progression, enhancing joint function and mobility, and decreasing the risk of total joint replacement15.  

The immune system is a complex defense system against foreign substances and pathogenic microorganisms.  The immune system produces antibodies from B lymphocytes (white blood cells), which bind to, and destroy invading organisms.  These antibodies are stored in the body to recognize, and destroy a recurring pathogen more effectively during follow up invasion.  T lymphocytes destroy invading pathogens by releasing toxic chemicals. They also release messenger chemicals to attract macrophagic white blood cells which engulf and kill pathogens.  T lymphocytes regulate immune responsiveness to specific agents, and can be divided into Th1 and Th2 cells.  Th1 cells are proposed to mostly mediate immune protection against intracellular viruses and certain bacteria, destroy cancerous cells, and activate delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. Th2 cells mediate immune protection against extracellular bacteria, parasites, allergens, and toxins. Immune dysfunction and over expression of Th1 cells may result in a proinflammatory state and organ specific autoimmunity.  Overexpression of Th2 is indicated in systemic autoimmunity and chronic allergy related conditions. 

CURCUMIN regulates Th1 and Th2 immune responses, as well as production of inflammatory mediators.  By modulating immune function and inhibiting inflammation, Curcumin demonstrates marked clinical efficacy in the treatment of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis26,27,49,50

SPIRULINA is well researched for its immune modulating activities.  It may enhance immune function by increasing cellular destruction of infectious agents, increasing antibody protection, and promoting production of other immune modulating chemicals.  Spirulina can also reduce immune system hyper-responsiveness as in the case of allergies, arthritis, and organ transplants54

UNTAMED HIP & JOINT – Equine is fortified with superfood, SPIRULINA, which functions in synergy with Curcumin and Boswellia to enhance health and restoration on various physiological levels.

SPIRULINA has exceptional nutritional properties with its rich composition of antioxidants, protein, fatty acids, fiber, vitamins and minerals. It serves as a prebiotic, supporting a healthy digestive environment, enhances physical performance 45,46, improves insulin sensitivity and blood glucose control42,44, supports immune function, protecting against allergies47, provides marked antioxidant protection, supports detoxification of toxic chemicals and heavy metals like fluoride, lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic34-38, promotes liver health48, exerts neuroprotective effects, reducing the risk of cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s’ and Parkinson’s disease39-41, and reduces systemic degenerative inflammation.  Spirulina enhances overall health and well-being, and increases protection against various chronic disease like cardiovascular disease 42,43, skin conditions, allergies, cancer, liver disease, and joint disease 33.

Spirulina, is considered a complete protein source, containing all amino acids required for healthy physiological function.  Protein is an essential component of all living cells, and a substrate for a multitude of physiological processes.  As a protein, Spirulina has significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immune modulating properties.  It enhances protection against toxins, viruses, and bacteria, reduces the risk of various cancers, promotes cardiovascular-, liver-, digestive- and hormonal health, maintains healthy skin and bone, supports healthy body weight, and promotes a sense of well-being.  Spirulina contains amino acids which form vital structural components in muscle cells, ligaments and tendons. Insufficient protein intake predisposes the animal to poor condition, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, impaired recovery after injury or training, and decreased mental ability. Protein rich diets promote a leaner and healthy body condition, and enhance muscle protein synthesis. Sufficient protein enables your horse to improve muscle composition and physical strength, especially when combined with regular exercise 56,57

Turmeric is a highly valued medicinal herb. Owing to CURCUMIN, its active constituent, it has been used for thousands of years for its remarkable medicinal benefits. Unfortunately, turmeric is not absorbed very well, and one has to take a large amount of turmeric powder to be of systemic benefit.  Hence the production of 95% Turmeric extract which provides pure curcumin, with higher medicinal significance in the body.  

Actions and health benefits of Curcumin 58-98

  • Antiallergenic: Turmeric is well known as an immunomodulatory herb. Curcumin alleviates symptoms associated with allergic immune responses by regulating Th-1(inflammatory) and Th-2 cytokine (autoimmunity/allergy) responses, inhibiting IgE levels, and inhibiting mast cell degranulation which releases histamine.  These properties give curcumin great potential for clinical management of allergic reactions like asthma, food allergies and allergy related skin conditions. 
  • Antimicrobial:  Curcumin provides broad-spectrum antimicrobial protection against bacteria like Staphylococcus epidermis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiela pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori,  Escherichia coli, Salmonella and many others; viruses like influenza viruses, herpes, coxsackie, hepatitis viruses, papilloma viruses, encephalitis viruses and many more; fungi like Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, and other skin fungi like T rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, E. floccosum and M. gypseum, and parasites Schistosomas, Toxocara canis, Eimeria species, Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Giardia lamblia, Leishmania and Cryptosporidium. 
  • Powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant:  Curcumin reduces inflammation by multiple mechanisms like inhibiting pro-inflammatory signaling, inhibiting immune cell migration to the active site of inflammation, and reducing excessive existing inflammation by decreasing the activity of inflammatory enzymes.
  • Neuroprotective:  Curcumin can protect nerve cells against inflammation and degeneration caused by multiple pathological agents including toxins, stress related high cortisol levels, and age-related degenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.
  • Protect against heart disease:  Curcumin provides protection against cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, atherosclerosis, blood clot formation and high cholesterol.
  • Antidiabetic: Curcumin illustrates promising protection against insulin resistance, diabetes and its associated inflammatory pathways.
  • Antiarthritic:  Curcumin is well researched for its powerful anti-inflammatory actions which, in addition to its protective properties on cartilage, adds exceptional medical value to this plant extract for the treatment of arthritic diseases. Research shows that a highly-concentrated curcumin extract stimulates the production of glycosaminoglycans and chondrocytes, which are involved in the formation and structural integrity of cartilage.  Curcumin supplementation can reduce joint pain, enhance articular function, and improve quality of movement.
  • Anticancer:  Research illustrates that high dose of concentrated Curcumin extract can inhibit the growth of various cancers and enhance the anticancer effects of chemotherapy drugs and radiation.  Curcumin, may alleviate the risk of cancer by supporting the natural defense mechanisms of a mammal by increasing antioxidant protection, inhibiting inflammatory degeneration, enhancing liver detoxification by down-regulating Phase I and enhancing Phase II detoxification of cancer-causing agents like cigarette smoke, benzopyrene, and DMBA, and inhibiting cancer cell development and spreading.
  • Accelerates wound healing: Curcumin exerts a significant wound healing effect owing to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, and immune-modulating characteristics. Curcumin targets various stages of wound healing. It promotes the removal of dead tissue from the site of injury, formation of new blood vessels in that area, granulation tissue, deposition of collagen for increased tissue strength and integrity, and wound closure.
  • Enhances skeletal muscle repair: Soft tissue injury is most often related to a sport injury.  The results are swelling, bruising, severe pain, and ultimately diminished muscle function & performance.  The repair process involves tissue degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, and scar tissue formation.  Curcumin promotes healthy muscle repair by supporting balanced and efficient anti-inflammatory-, immune- and anti-oxidant responses,which enhances muscle cell regeneration and accelerates recovery. By modulating inflammation, reducing lactate accumulation and reducing pain following intensive exercise, curcumin facilitates a faster return to training and increases the capacity for higher training intensity.
  • Supports healthy digestive function: Curcumin provides significant anti-inflammatory protection in the digestive tract, alleviating inflammatory damage, abdominal pain and gastric discomfort associated with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and H. pylori- induced ulcers.

 BOSWELLIA

Boswellic acid, a constituent of Boswellia, has potent anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, pain-relieving, antibacterial, anti-anxiety, and anti-neurotic properties.  Clinical studies indicate that Boswellic acids have the ability to modulate many mediators involved in disease progression. It exhibits clinical efficacy in the treatment of conditions like: arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, various cancers and tumours, cognitive impairment, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis, sinusitis, diabetes, central nervous system disorders, and psoriasis.99-100

Untamed HIP & JOINT-Equine is a revolutionary joint supplement, providing natural, human grade extracts and superfoods with significant medicinal value.     It is scientifically formulated to provide effective and safe joint care and helps your horse to keep living a healthy and happy lifestyle

PRODUCT INFO

• Glucosamine Potassium Sulfate
• Boswellia 65% extract
• Turmeric/Curcumin 95% extract
• Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis)

Loading (35 days):
Horses <500 kg:1 scoop 2x daily (20g)
Horses >500 kg:1.5 scoop 2x daily (30g)

Maintenance:
Horses <500 kg:1/2 scoop 2x daily (10g)
Horses >500 kg:1 scoop 2x daily (20g)

*Horses can be maintained on the loading phase if needed.
*Mix into feed, starting with small amounts.
*Can add coconut oil to supplement before mixing into feed. 

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